BBG’s New Herb Garden Is Open!

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    • Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot) at BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot) at BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • Eschscholzia californica (california poppy) and Lavendula (lavender) in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.Eschscholzia californica (california poppy) and Lavendula (lavender) in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • Lactuca sativa (lettuces ) at BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.Lactuca sativa (lettuces ) at BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • Triticum aestivum L. (green wheat ) in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.Triticum aestivum L. (green wheat ) in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • Papaver species at BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert. Papaver species at BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • Trifolium repens (clover) and Asperula tinctoria (dyer's woodruff) in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.Trifolium repens (clover) and Asperula tinctoria (dyer's woodruff) in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • A Brassica in the Herb Garden, gone to flower and attracting pollinators. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
A Brassica in the Herb Garden, gone to flower and attracting pollinators. Photo by Jean-Marc Grambert.
    • Pollinators can't resist this dramatic artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) now blooming in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Elizabeth Peters.Pollinators can't resist this dramatic artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) now blooming in BBG's Herb Garden. Photo by Elizabeth Peters.
    • The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.
    • The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.
    • The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.
    • Trio of California poppies (Eschscholzia californica) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Alexandra Muller.Trio of California poppies (Eschscholzia californica) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Alexandra Muller.
    • A bee with loaded pollen baskets looks to land on a California poppy in the Herb Garden. Photo by Alexandra Muller.A bee with loaded pollen baskets looks to land on a California poppy in the Herb Garden. Photo by Alexandra Muller.
    • The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.
    • The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.
    • The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.The BBG Herb Garden 2011. Photo by Chris Roddick.
    • Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • Poppy (Papaver somniferum) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.Poppy (Papaver somniferum) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • Papaver somniferum in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.Papaver somniferum in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • Romaine freckles lettuce (Lactuca sativa) looking tasty in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.Romaine freckles lettuce (Lactuca sativa) looking tasty in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • Looseleaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.Looseleaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in the Herb Garden. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • The Herb Garden in spring. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.The Herb Garden in spring. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • The Herb Garden in spring. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.The Herb Garden in spring. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • The Herb Garden in spring. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.The Herb Garden in spring. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
    • The Herb Garden after heavy May rain. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.The Herb Garden after heavy May rain. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.

    After two years of construction, Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s new Herb Garden opened to the public the first week of June. With a focus on the origins, botany, and beauty of the plants we know as food, the garden’s herbs and vegetables are grouped geographically according to where they were first domesticated and brought into cultivation. The garden is designed to be a decorative but utilitarian kitchen garden that freely mixes medicinal and culinary herbs, vegetables, berries, fruit trees, and flowers.

    Some of the regions and crops visitors can see in the new Herb Garden include:

    The Americas

    Today tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, corn, pumpkins, and sweet potatoes are ubiquitous in cuisines worldwide; it’s hard to believe that most were introduced from North and South America only a few hundred years ago.

    Northern Mediterranean

    The quintessential culinary herbs rosemary, thyme, sage, and oregano all hail from the northern Mediterranean. Vegetables from this part of the world include plants from the cabbage family as well as carrots, beets, and artichokes.

    The Fertile Crescent and Sub-Saharan Africa

    A large percentage of the world’s food plants originated in this relatively small region, comprising the modern-day countries Iraq, Syria, Turkey, and Iran. From this “cradle of civilization” came grains like wheat, barley, and rye, as well as onions, garlic, lettuce, and many legumes.

    East, South, and Southeast Asia and the Pacific

    This vast area ranging from India to the South Pacific originated staples like rice and soybeans as well as several major tropical food crops like taro and sugarcane.

    The new Herb Garden also displays medicinal herbs and fruit trees including cherries, plums, peaches, nectarines, apples, and pears. It truly is a remarkable garden, and we hope you’ll come to visit and see it grow this summer.


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