Making Brooklyn Bloom 2019

Saturday, March 9, 2019 | 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
We’re in the Palm House! Enter at 1000 Washington Avenue.

Growing a Greener City, Block by Block

Making Brooklyn Bloom

The theme of this year’s conference is rooted in BBG programs that reach beyond the Garden’s gates into the community. Lessons learned from participants in the Greenest Block in Brooklyn contest—celebrating its 25th anniversary this year—will be highlighted. Serving as a centerpiece for the day, a unique keynote address delivered by the garden mentors of the 300 East 25th Street Block Association will honor the power of intergenerational collaboration and neighborly connection. As ever, visitors will have the opportunity to network with dozens of NYC greening organizations in the Palm House.

Download & Bring Event Flyer for Free Admission (PDF) ›

Wilbur A. Levin Keynote Address

Stories of Home: People and Plants on the Greenest Block in Brooklyn

Julia Charles, Hazel Deane, Pauline Green, Grace Henry, Vera Toney, and Carol Wilson, 300 East 25th Street Block Association, frequent winners of the Greenest Block in Brooklyn contest

A group of people posing on a lushly planted stoop

“Our block is a place where old meets new, where people—young and old—from diverse origins share through horticulture, weaving vibrant colors and rhythms into creative planters, window boxes, and tree bed gardens. When you hear our story, we hope it will encourage you to reach outside your comfort zone and beyond your block, band together in neighborly comradeship, and create a loving and beautiful environment.”

Workshops

Learn more about the workshops offered.

Register the morning of the event to secure a spot in the workshop of your choosing. Arrive early to get your first choices. You may choose one morning and one afternoon workshop, space permitting.

Morning Workshop Descriptions

Beautiful Containers for a Block United
Lily Pool Room
Olivia Avery and Robert (Bob) Johnson, Vanderveer Place Block Association
Vanderveer Place, which won the Greenest Block in Brooklyn contest in its first year and three more times since then, is arguably the birthplace of the contest. Its exceptional drought-tolerant sidewalk planters consistently wow the judges. Learn from their hard-earned lessons how to grow vibrant containers and a vibrant community.

Carnivorous Plants*
Room 236
Will Lenihan, Brooklyn Botanic Garden
The deceit and seduction of carnivorous plants dooms many insects and ignites our imaginations. Learn the identification, biology, cultivation, feeding, and conservation needs of these wonderful plants. Prepare a specialized growing medium and pot up your own carnivore to take home.

Explore the Tropical Pavilion
Steinhardt Conservatory, lower level
BBG Garden Guides
The Tropical House—6,000 square feet under a 65-foot-tall ceiling—re-creates a tropical forest, complete with waterfalls and streams. Discover the many food plants that thrive here!

Grassroots Fundraising*
Library
Katie Grassle, Citizens Committee for NYC
Learn how to raise money through grants or from your neighbors. Whether it’s through a garden party, bake sale, or grant application, you can find the best fundraising strategy for your local community.

Growing Gardeners in Brooklyn’s Schools: Reflections on 30 Years of PGR
Auditorium
Sara Epstein, Shannon Post, and Lupe Terrones, BBG; Heather Loney, PS 145; Hawa Diallo, GAP; Yvonne Arenas, St. Francis College
Project Green Reach (PGR) extends the Garden to Brooklyn’s K–8 Title I schools by providing inquiry-based science instruction, plants, guided tours of BBG, teacher training, and supplies for a community horticulture project. Its Junior Botanist and Plant Investigator summer program also engages rising 5th through 8th graders in gardening, cooking, science, and nature at BBG. Learn more about the long-lasting impacts of this amazing program, now celebrating its 30th season!

Here for Good: Refugees Share Food Traditions*
Room 123
Sheryll Durrant, Rose Nzapa-Ayeke, Estela Pereda, and Bintou Kujabi, New Roots Community Farm
The International Rescue Committee’s New Roots Community Farm supports refugee resettlement in the Bronx by sharing skills and building community through food. New Roots gardeners will share personal recipes and cooking techniques from their home countries as well as tips for saving seeds and growing delicious vegetables right here in the city.

Multiply Plants for Sharing*
Greenhouse 1
Joanne D’auria and Shamimara Begum, Brooklyn Botanic Garden
There’s no better way to spread the love of gardening with your neighbors than making free plants. Explore propagating with runners, bulbs, rhizomes, leaf and stem cuttings, offsets, and adventitious buds. Turn common grocery store items into garden glory. You’ll take home your own plants to multiply!

Place-Keeping: The Anti-Gentrification Tool Kit*
Members’ Room
Alexis Mena and Nick Savvides, Brooklyn Urban Gardeners
Art and gardens can serve as powerful catalysts to fight profit-driven destabilization of our communities. Inspired by ARTs East New York, come unpack a tool kit for cultivating a resident-led vision of the future.

Seed Saving: Stories of Liberation*
Room 125
Owen Taylor, Truelove Seeds
Keeping the seeds and seed stories of our ancestors is essential to preserving our past and safeguarding our future freedom. Explore the rich stories of heirloom seed crops, and dig into the science and practice of collecting and storing seed using common kitchen items.

Worm Composting at Home*
Greenhouse 3
Cuyler Remick and Teddy Tedesco, NYC Compost Project Hosted by BBG
Compost happens—even in your tiny apartment! Learn how to harness the power of red worms to convert your kitchen scraps into black gold, no matter where you live.

* Hands-on or interactive workshops

Afternoon Workshop Descriptions

Beautiful Containers for a Block United
Lily Pool Room
Olivia Avery and Robert (Bob) Johnson, Vanderveer Place Block Association
Vanderveer Place, which won the Greenest Block in Brooklyn contest in its first year and three more times since then, is arguably the birthplace of the contest. Its exceptional drought-tolerant sidewalk planters consistently wow the judges. Learn from their hard-earned lessons how to grow vibrant containers and a vibrant community.

Carnivorous Plants*
Room 236
Will Lenihan, Brooklyn Botanic Garden
The deceit and seduction of carnivorous plants dooms many insects and ignites our imaginations. Learn the identification, biology, cultivation, feeding, and conservation needs of these wonderful plants. Prepare a specialized growing medium and pot up your own carnivore to take home.

Community Organizing 101*
Library
Arif Ullah, Citizens Committee for NYC
Get an overview of how to bring about meaningful community change. Learn how to address your neighborhood’s most pressing needs and target specific solutions. Gain tools you can use to craft a mission statement, strategize your action plan, recruit volunteers, and build alliances.

Go with the Flow: Tour BBG’s Water Conservation Project
Meet at Lily Pool Terrace
BBG Garden Guide
BBG’s groundbreaking Water Conservation Project, the first of its kind in North America, is really making a splash. Learn how this innovative water recirculation system serves as a beautiful model for reducing dependence on freshwater and lessening combined sewer overflow. Weather permitting.

Here for Good: Refugees Share Food Traditions*
Room 123
Sheryll Durrant, Rose Nzapa-Ayeke, Estela Pereda, and Bintou Kujabi, New Roots Community Farm
The International Rescue Committee’s New Roots Community Farm supports refugee resettlement in the Bronx by sharing skills and building community through food. New Roots gardeners will share personal recipes and cooking techniques from their home countries as well as tips for saving seeds and growing delicious vegetables right here in the city.

Multiply Plants for Sharing*
Greenhouse 1
Joanne D’auria and Shamimara Begum, Brooklyn Botanic Garden
There’s no better way to spread the love of gardening with your neighbors than making free plants. Explore propagating with runners, bulbs, rhizomes, leaf and stem cuttings, offsets, and adventitious buds. Turn common grocery store items into garden glory. You’ll take home your own plants to multiply!

Place-Keeping: The Anti-Gentrification Tool Kit*
Members’ Room
Alexis Mena and Nick Savvides, Brooklyn Urban Gardeners
Art and gardens can serve as powerful catalysts to fight profit-driven destabilization of our communities. Inspired by ARTs East New York, come unpack a tool kit for cultivating a resident-led vision of the future.

Seed Starting: Preserving Our Cultures*
Room 125
Owen Taylor, Truelove Seeds
Keeping the seeds and seed stories of our ancestors is essential to preserving our past and safeguarding our future freedom. Explore the rich stories of heirloom seed crops, and dig into the science and practice of collecting and storing seed using common kitchen items.

Wild and Neat Native Plants
Auditorium
Diana Gruberg, Gowanus Canal Conservancy (GCC)
Native plants are essential to the health of our local ecosystem, and cities can play a central role in their conservation and restoration. Get great garden design advice from the GCC’s native plant nurserywoman on planning, sourcing, and planting colorful, pollinator-friendly plant palettes, whether you’re digging into a community garden, yard, street tree bed, or container.

Worm Composting at Home*
Greenhouse 3
Cuyler Remick and Teddy Tedesco, NYC Compost Project Hosted by BBG
Compost happens—even in your tiny apartment! Learn how to harness the power of red worms to convert your kitchen scraps into black gold, no matter where you live.

* Hands-on or interactive workshops

Schedule

10–11 a.m.

Registration and Coffee in the Palm House


Register the day of the event to secure space for workshops and the keynote address.
11 a.m.–Noon

Morning Workshops

The final schedule will be listed at registration. You may choose one morning and one afternoon workshop, space permitting. Arrive early to get your first choices.

  • Beautiful Containers for a Block United
  • Carnivorous Plants
  • Explore the Tropical Pavilion
  • Grassroots Fundraising
  • Growing Gardeners in Brooklyn’s Schools: Reflections on 30 Years of Project Green Reach
  • Here for Good: Refugees Share Food Traditions
  • Multiply Plants for Sharing
  • Place-Keeping: The Anti-Gentrification Tool Kit
  • Seed Saving: Stories of Liberation
  • Worm Composting at Home
Noon–1:30 p.m.

Snacks and boxed lunches are available for purchase at the Yellow Magnolia Coffee Bar in the Visitor Center.

Bring a Bag Lunch Zones

Look for signage in classrooms and the Palm House for areas to sit, eat your lunch, and chat with fellow attendees.

Activities

  • Palm House: View exhibits presented by New York City greening organizations.
  • Conservatory: Join a guided walking tour of BBG’s seasonal highlights (1–2 p.m.).
  • Rotunda: Pick up free seeds.
  • Rotunda: Bring your questions to the “Ask the Gardener” table.
  • Rotunda: Meet bugs and slugs at the American Museum of Natural History table.
  • Rotunda: Learn about BBG’s Children’s Education programs.
  • Rotunda: Check out the Library.
1:30–2:45 p.m.

Wilbur A. Levin Keynote Address
Auditorium

“Stories of Home: People and Plants on the Greenest Block in Brooklyn,” presented by Julia Charles, Hazel Deane, Pauline Green, Grace Henry, Vera Toney, and Carol Wilson of the 300 East 25th Street Block Association

3–4 p.m.

Afternoon Workshops

The final schedule will be listed at registration. You may choose one morning and one afternoon workshop, space permitting. Arrive early to get your first choices.

  • Beautiful Containers for a Block United
  • Carnivorous Plants
  • Community Organizing 101
  • Go with the Flow: Tour BBG’s Water Conservation Project
  • Here for Good: Refugees Share Food Traditions
  • Multiply Plants for Sharing
  • Place-Keeping: The Anti-Gentrification Tool Kit
  • Seed Starting: Preserving Our Cultures
  • Wild and Neat Native Plants
  • Worm Composting at Home
4 p.m.

Pick up a spring gift bag as you leave!

 

Questions? Contact [email protected] or call 718-623-7250.

Accommodation can be made for visitors in wheelchairs or with limited mobility. If you need additional accessibility accommodation, please contact us at [email protected] by February 21.

Support

Brooklyn Botanic Garden gratefully acknowledges support for these programs from Brooklyn Community Foundation, National Grid, NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, the NYS Assembly and NYS Senate, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, the NYC Department of Sanitation, Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams, Councilmembers Laurie Cumbo, Mathieu Eugene, and Alicka Ampry-Samuel, and the NYC Council.

Leadership Support, Community Greening Programs
Logo: Brooklyn Community Foundation Logo: NY Culture. Department of Cultural Affairs.

Major Sponsor, Community Greening Programs
Logo: National Grid


Upcoming Dates

Saturday, March 9, 2019
Making Brooklyn Bloom 2011
Making Brooklyn Bloom 2011. Photo by Rebecca Bullene.
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